New Article

Gene therapy

Alexander Jares Stony Brook University School of Medicine, New York
20 July 2018

50 years after it was first proposed, gene therapy - the modification of DNA to treat disease - has gone from science fiction to clinical reality. However, as prices for gene therapies are released, widespread sticker-shock is raising questions about affordability and fair pricing.

European Relations

The New EU

Eoin Gahan
The new EU27 must look beyond itself and focus on relevant global challenges, which are greater than internal difficulties.

Brexit: the UK in the departure lounge

Eoin Gahan
If Brexit happens, the UK will not be in a strong position to face global challenges. Lagging in trade openness and innovation, and facing a divergent regulatory environment and declining foreign investment, the UK will struggle to re-negotiate trade deals with global partners. Conversely, as the influence of the EU moves east, increased political coherence could benefit the Euro and EU financial sector.

European Trade and Investment

Eoin Gahan
The rules no longer apply. The biggest challenge facing the new EU is the growing threat to the international economic order. From banking to free movement of people and goods to international law and trade, bilateral alliances and unilateral moves have undermined existing structures. As Brexit heats up, a new 2-part series from trade expert Eoin Gahan will explore its trade and investment prospects.

Nano-bionic life

Joseph J Richardson University of Melbourne & Kang Liang University of New South Wales
6 June 2018

'Bionic life' utilizes non-biological supermaterials to give organisms emergent properties outside the scope of evolution. Analogous to space suits worn by astronauts, such materials can protect an organism from harsh and toxic environments, and allow them to live off normally indigestible molecules. This technology has the potential to revolutionize areas such as the pharmaceutical industry, toxic waste remediation and space travel.

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Evidence in policymaking

Stephanie Mathisen Sense about Science
23 April 2018

Show your workings! Why transparency in the evidence used in policymaking matters, and why the public care to know. With a clear chain of reasoning and meaningful transparency, trust can be built between the government and the public on matters that affect us all.

An Evolutionary Arms Race

Charlotte Kerr, Laura Higham FAI Farms, Oxford & Øistein Thorsen FAI Farms
Around 700,000 lives are lost worldwide due to antimicrobial-resistant infections every year. Without viable antibiotic treatment options we are likely to return to a relative dark age of medicine – a time when common infections or injuries could kill, and common surgeries and immunosuppressive therapies may become unfeasible.

Latino Kids and Autism. Why Are They Diagnosed So Late?

Ranit Mishori Georgetown University School of Medicine, Jeanine Warisse Turner Georgetown University's Center for Communication, Culture, and Technology (CCT), Alisse Hannaford Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai & Matthew Biel MedStar Georgetown University Medical Center/Georgetown University School of Medicine

Moving the borders into healthcare

Fozia Hamid & Lucy Jones Doctors of the World UK
A political drive in the UK is leading to undermining of access to primary and emergency care for many vulnerable groups despite evidence of potential harm to individual and public health. Bringing little if any economic benefit, the policy to introduce charges for primary care and A&E for visitors and migrants is progressing at pace while critics of the policy are side-lined.

Reading the Path of Antibiotic Decline in Bacterial DNA

Nicola J Fawcett & Louise J Pankhurst University of Oxford
DNA sequencing is an exciting modern technology, that has vastly improved our ability to treat infections. However antibiotic resistance is a growing problem and DNA sequencing is revealing the challenge we face as bacteria are rapidly evolving resistance to antibiotics.

How climate services can help the world’s poor

Filippo Lechthaler Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich), Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH), Alexandra Vinogradova Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich), Moritz Flubacher Federal Office of Meteorology and Climatology MeteoSwiss & Andrea Rossa Federal Office for Meteorology and Climatology MeteoSwiss
28 March 2018

Can climate information serve as a possible adaptation strategy to changing climate conditions?

About Angle

Tackling global challenges, one issue at a time. From energy and the environment to economics, development and global health, our expert contributors look at all angles. ANGLE focuses on the intersection of science, policy and politics in an evolving and complex world.

Brought to you from the team at Imperial College's A Global Village.

Most Popular

  1. Cancer: A Global Issue

    Carina Crawford Cancer Research UK
  2. Coping with Air Pollution in an Age of Urbanisation

    Marguerite Nyhan Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  3. Gene therapy

    Alexander Jares Stony Brook University School of Medicine, New York
  4. The logic of synthetic biology: turning cells into computers

    Matthew R. Bennett Rice University
  5. How to Plan a Successful Biopharma Product Rollout

    Juergen Luecke The Boston Consulting Group

Kill the Bill

Corrado Nai Technische Universität Berlin
20 March 2018

Science is experiencing a crisis which revolves around scholarly publishing. The open access model of “pay to publish”, in which authors pay a charge to cover production and subscription costs, is increasingly shaking the traditional subscription model in which universities pay for access. Can we move away from today’s profit-driven publishing model and towards an open, shared and collaborative scientific community?

SCIENCE POLICY

Crossing the astronomical divide between science and policy

Thierry J.-L. Courvoisier University of Geneva
Science has deeply shaped our world and allowed human beings to live the life we know, having an enormous impact on the planet. Scientists now have an important responsibility in helping societies make the decisions needed to ensure harmonious development for all of mankind.

The Role of Interdisciplinary Institutes in Knowledge Diffusion

Alyssa Gilbert Imperial College London
Universities are sitting on a vast swathe of untapped knowledge and by presenting this information in different formats to new audiences it is possible to forge more and various effective conduits to the non-academic world.

Bridging science and government

Tateo Arimoto National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies, Yasushi Sato & Keiko Matsuo Japan Science and Technology Agency, Center for Research and Development Strategy
As science and technology have come to play critical roles in addressing (and in some cases precipitating) diverse issues in contemporary society, demand for scientific advice has soared.

A Gaming Revolution for International Development

Mariam Adil World Bank Group
There are more than one billion people living under $1.25 a day and almost the same number playing at least one hour of video games worldwide. So, how can the popularity of games be harnessed for positive social change?
Copyright 2015 ANGLE Journal